RESOLUTIONS

The basic job of a draft resolution is to propose a solution to a problem. It is important to learn how to prepare a draft resolution for MUN because the ultimate goal of each MUN committee is to solve problems in the world by debating your draft resolutions. 

Each delegate will write at least one draft resolution. Your goal is to submit this draft resolution to your committee for debate during session. Before the draft resolution is approved for debate, there are a number of steps it must go through:

Step 1: You will need to find five other countries who support your draft resolution and are prepared to co-submit it with you - you will have time to lobby for support on the first day;

Step 2: Once you have met the quota for co-submitters/co-signatories, you must bring your draft resolution to the approval panel (typically teachers) who will check the formatting and spelling;

Step 3: Once the approval panel passes your draft resolution, the third step is to bring two copies of the resolution to the chairperson of your committee (one for the chairperson and one for the secretary) - part of the chairperson's job is to read all resolutions and decide whether resolutions are going to be debated or not and in which order they will be debated. 

HOW TO WRITE A RESOLUTION

A resolution has THREE main parts: (a) heading; (b) preambulatory clauses;  (c) operative clauses - each of these parts is looked at in the notes below: 

(a) Heading 

The heading contains four pieces of information: your committee name, the topic being discussed, your country name and the names of your co-submitters/co-signatories. 

(b) Preambulatory clauses 

The preamble of a draft resolution states the reasons for which the committee is addressing the topic. Each clause generally begins with a present participle (-ing) and always ends with a comma.

They may include content such as:

  • Mentions of statements made by the Secretary-General or a relevant UN body or agency; 
  • Recognition of the efforts of regional or nongovernmental organizations in dealing with the issue;
  • References to the UN Charter or other applicable legal frameworks;
  • General statements on the topic in terms of its significance and its impact,
  • Citations of past UN resolutions or treaties on the topic under discussion;

There are many stock phrases which are helpful in constructing preambulatory clauses: 

Accepting that        
Affirming        
Alarmed by
Approving
Bearing in mind
Believing
Contemplating
Declaring
Deeply concerned by                             
Deeply conscious of
Deeply convinced of
Deeply disturbed by
Deeply regretting
Desiring
Calling upon       
Acknowledging          
Emphasizing
Affirming                           
Appealing to                      
Asking that     
Aware of                    
Bearing in mind         
Believing        
Calling for         

Commending    
Condemning             
Congratulating          
Deploring                   
Expecting        
Expressing its appreciation                              
Fulfilling
Fully aware of
Deploring
Further deploring
Further recalling
Guided by
Having considered
Expressing its satisfaction
Fully alarmed by
Fully believing that                    
Having considered     
Having considered further
Having examined        
Having received
Keeping in mind
Noting with deep concern
Noting with satisfaction
Noting further

Hoping for
Requesting that
Observing
Reaffirming
Realizing
Recalling
Recognizing
Referring to
Seeking
Taking into consideration
Taking note of
Viewing with appreciation
Welcoming
Having heard 
Having received
Having studied           
Noting with appreciation
Noting with approval
Noting with regret
Pointing out
Reminding
Strongly affirming
Strongly condemning
Taking into account

Example of Preambulatory Clause:

Noting with deep concern the 17% increase in HIV/AIDS contraction in sub-Saharan African countries in the past five years,

(c) Operative clauses 

Operative clauses state the solutions which the resolution is proposing to resolve the issue - they should address the issues raised in the preambulatory clauses. 

Tip: Usually more details in an operative clause will make it stronger or at least make the idea clearer to other delegates. A simple way to strengthen each operative clause is to answer the “who, what, when, where, why, and how” of each clause with sub-clauses underneath each main operative clause. Again, there are many stock phrases which are helpful in constructing operative clauses: 

Accepts           
Affirms
Approves
Authorizes
Calls
Calls upon
Condemns
Confirms
Congratulates
Considers
Declares accordingly                                
Deplores
Designates
Draws the attention
Emphasizes
Appeals          
Asks
Calls for         
Commends 


Demands (usually only used by Security Council)                        
Encourages     
Endorses
Expresses its appreciation
Expresses its hope
Further invites
Further proclaims
Further reminds
Further recommends   
Further requests
Has resolved
Notes
Proclaims
Reaffirms
Recommends
Regrets
Reminds

Requests
Solemnly affirms
Strongly condemns
Supports
Takes note of
Transmits
Trusts
Further resolves         
Hopes 
Invites            
Offers
Proposes        
Renews
Resolves
Seeks
Strongly urges
Suggests
Urges 


Example of Operative Clause:

Calls upon developed countries and major pharmaceutical companies to provide low cost medicines for HIV/AIDS to sub-Saharan African countries. 

Sample Resolution

Sample_Resolution.pdf

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